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Hungarian Partridge
Ringneck Pheasant
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Magic Quail Biotics
Covey Base Camp
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Pickled Quail Eggs
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Northern Bobwhite Quail

Northern Bobwhite Quail

Northern Bobwhites are distinguished by a dark cap stripe behind the eye along the head, black in males and brown in females. The area in between is white on males and yellow-brown on females. The body is brown, speckled in places with black or white on both sexes, and average weight is 5–6 ounces (140–170 g). Bobwhite quail chicks are very small, and need to be kept warm for a number of days. The Northern Bobwhite's song is a rising, clear whistle, bob-White! or bob-bob-White! The call is most often given by males in spring and summertime. Other vocalizations include a range of squeaky whistles.
 

Jumbo Bobwhite Quail

Jumbo Bobwhite Quail

The Bob White Quail The best-known species in the United States is the northern bobwhite, named from the loud call of the male. A popular game bird, it was originally resident east of the Rockies and north to southern Ontario and New England; it has been successfully introduced in parts of western North America, the West Indies, and New Zealand. It is 21 to 26 cm (8.5 to 10.5 in) long, with a slight crest. Males of the northern populations are reddish brown above and white, barred with black, on the belly. The throat and a line above the eye are white; a broad black line extends from the eye backward and around the throat. This white area is replaced by buff in the otherwise similar females. In subspecies from the southwestern United States and parts of Mexico, the face, throat, and variable amounts of the rest of the underparts are black. Monogamous, after the breeding season, bobwhites gather into coveys—groups that may number over 100 birds—dispersing during the day for feeding and reassembling at night or in adverse weather. The members of the covey seek warmth and protection by huddling in a circle, with their heads turned outward. If frightened, bobwhites (like most quail) prefer to run from danger; when flushed, they fly rapidly with a loud whirring sound, but quickly drop to earth. Bobwhite Quail are generally seen in the wild in the Midwest and Southern United States as well as parts of Mexico. Bobwhite quail are small, chunky birds and usually travel on foot and stay in a limited area. Bobwhite quail are primarily seed eaters, although they do eat some insects in the wild. Bobwhite Quail chicks are tiny- about the size of bumblebees. Bobwhite Quail, noted for its flavorful meat, has become a high-end alternative to chicken for many connoisseurs. The bobwhites probably have the largest number of calls with at least 19 distinct calls. Jumbo Wisconsin and Georgia Giant are also a variety of the bobwhite quail. Breeding of Northern Bobwhites is now a profitable business. Bobwhite quail, especially the young chicks, are sensitive to poor feed quality. Most successful producers typically raise breeders with the intent to market the resultant chicks at one day of age to growout producers, or they specialize in the growout of day-old chicks until approximately 17 weeks of age to sell as flight-ready birds to game preserve owners. Coccidiosis normally attacks birds at the age of 2-6 weeks and birds that are on litter or ground environment. Using a proper starter feed can help with prevention of this disease. Wet litter and buildup of droppings around waterers and feeders is a common source of overwhelming infections. Nipple waterers significantly reduce the occurrence of wet litter and are simpler to clean than trough waterers. The two basic production facilities used for producing Bobwhite quail are referred to as flight pens and quail barns. Breeders are typically housed in one of three ways: in large community floor pens, in smaller communal cages designed for 10 to 20 birds each, or caged as pairs or trios.
 

Jumbo Brown Quail

Jumbo Brown Quail

Common names: Jumbo Brown, Pharoah, Bible Quail, I'm sure there are more . . . Incubation period: 17 days Humidity for incubator: 50 - 60% Move to hatcher/stop turning: 14 days Matures at: 8 weeks Benefits of raising: Fast-growing, easy to raise and the largest of the Coturnix varieties. These birds make great meat production birds or egg-layers. The eggs are more round in shape and can be hard to fit into quail egg trays. Size/Weight: 14+ ounces Sexing: Difficult to the untrianed eye. The females may be a bit larger than the males, and will have lighter feathering on the breast, also the feathering is different in shape - longer and pointy where as the breast feathering on a male is shorter and more rounded in shape. Space/pen requirements: Much like the Texas A&Ms, we place 25 birds in one 24”x30” pen with external feeder and automatic waterer. If you had an internal feeder and waterer with a large footprint, 20 would be a more appropriate number. We prefer wire cages for these birds. Chicks seem to be somewhat susceptible to bacterial infections - disinfecting of all equipment in between use such as incubator, brooders, feeder/waterers, etc. is highly recommended as is daily disinfecting the feeder/waterers. Use a good product like TekTrol. Cedar shavings are poisonous to birds and should never be used. Newspapers, especially on young chicks, can cause leg and feet problems. For secure footing for young chicks, I recommend rubbery shelf-liner. Breeding Ratio: 20 females to 5 males in one pen seems to be a great ratio. Special Needs: Very few, these are fairly easy, laid-back birds to raise which are very hardy and seem to have very little problems.
 

Texas A&M Quail

Texas A&M Quail

Welcome to CM Game Bird Farms White Coturnix Quail Page. These birds get 12-14 ounces, depending on your feed program. If you keep them on a grower feed they will get the biggest possible size. They dress out at 73% total meat which is a white meat and taste like the bobwhite quail meat. We have limited quantities of eggs, chicks and adults and ALL orders will be on a first come first serve basis. Our prices are the best you will find on the internet or ANYWHERE for that matter.. for the quality that you will find with us. So why not go ahead and order your birds NOW for this SPRING!!! We will be sold out very soon, we have had so many customers ask for these so their wish is our command!!! ENJOY!!
 

Valley Quail

Valley Quail

Of all the birds native to the state of California, none is more universally enjoyed and appreciated than the California Valley Quail. The handsome plumage, pert demeanor, and melodious calls are appealing to everyone fortunate enough to know the species, and is it is not surprising that in 1931 the State Legislature by unanimous acclamation declared the California quail to be the State Bird of California (Leopold, 1977). This attractive bird is known by many names, including, California partridge, Catalina quail, Topknot quail and Valley Quail. It is known commonly in California as the Valley quail, to distinguish it from the Mountain quail; but ornithologists now recognize two subspecies, the California quail and the Valley quail, both entirely distinct from the Mountain quail (Forbush, 1917). The range of this quail is made up of varied topography and climatical conditions. It is found from Baja California, Mexico, up through the western states into Canada. Its eastward range goes as for as Nevada, Utah and Idaho with introductions in Colorado. In captivity, the California quail is one of the easier quail to get to breed. They are by nature very nervous and thus do not do as well in small cages as some of the other quail. It is believed they do much better on the ground if you have a drier climate or if you make dry ground available for them. Many are raised on wire every year so there is no hard rule about them.
 

Gambel Quail

Gambel Quail

The Gambel's Quail is a well known species in aviculture and in the wild. Also known as the Arizona, top-knot or desert quail, they are found in arid areas of the southwestern United States and parts of Mexico. Gambel's Quail have also been successfully introduced to Lanai and Hawaii in the Hawaiian Archipelago. Paul Johnsgard describes seven subspecies, all of which are similar and I don't believe that the subspecies are differentiated in captive populations. This species is often confused with the related Valley Quail. Males of both species share the black top-knot plume. Male Gambel's can be distinguished by having no scaling on the lower breast, but rather having a yellowish belly with a large black spot. The top of the head is rusty brown with a white border and a black face, forehead and chin; the back and upper breast is grayish brown with rusty brown flanks that have white streaks. Females also have a top-knot, but it is much smaller in size. Her overall coloration is similar to the male, but she lacks the black and white face, the black breast spot and the rust color on her is much lighter. The hen is also slightly smaller than the male. In the wild, Gambel's Quail form large groups or coveys. Dr. Leland Hayes reported flocks as large as 200 during the winter in Arizona! During the spring, these large flocks break up and the males begin to draw females to their chosen territory. Fights between rival males can become quite vicious while they try to draw mates into their territories. Breeding This species is a prolific layer in captivity and clutch sizes are quite large. I noticed that they do not start laying until mid-May, but I'm sure it is much earlier in warmer climates. In the wild, the female does the incubating which lasts about 23 days. The male often stands close-by and helps with the brooding. I've yet to have a Gambel hen go broody in captivity, but they hatch well and the tiny chicks are easy to raise. They do grow fast, flying at about three weeks of age! General Comments This species is real joy to have in your aviary and the male's call reminds one of the old-west movies! They are very active and nervous, therefore require a larger pen than most quail. We keep our Gambel's on wire, but they do well on the ground in well drained pens. Our cages include many branches for perching and a pan of sand for a dust bath. We provide limbs of pine needles that the hens nest under. Gambel's can be quite aggressive when adding new birds to an existing flock during the breeding season. If you must add a new bird, do so during the winter when they form coveys. It is also a good idea to keep many birds together during the cold months, this way they will naturally form a covey for warmth
 

Mountain Quail

Mountain Quail

The Mountain Quail (Oreortyx pictus) is probably one of the most striking of all the members of the quail family. Its natural range is from Baja California up through California and Oregon into Washington. It is by far the largest quail and has some of the most desirable characteristics of any quail kept in captivity. The adults measure between 10½”-11½” long. The sexes are very similar in appearance, with both males and females having straight, narrow, blackish crests composed of only two feathers, which appear with the juvenile plumage. The throat is chestnut, edged with black, and this is separated from the slate grey chest, neck and head by a narrow white line. The back, wings and tail are an olive grey colour, and the flanks are dark brown with bold black and white bars. The females generally have a brownish patch at the name of the neck, although this may not be apparent until the birds have moulted at the end of their first year. The eggs are a plain light beige colour, without any spots or patches. Incubation is most successful at a temperature of 37.5ºC, with lowish humidity of about 50%. The eggs take anything between 24-28 days to hatch, and often hatch over a three day period. It’s a good idea to leave unhatched eggs in the incubator or hatcher for an extra few days, just in case any further chicks pop out. Mountain quail have a justified reputation for not being regular producers. The hens certainly don’t lay every day, and not all eggs laid are fertile. Mountain Quail chicks(Oreortyx pictus) Mountain Quail Chicks (Oreortyx pictus) As with other quail, the chicks are quite delicate when first hatched and some may die in the first few days. The use of red bulbs in the brooder is preferable to white, as it helps to discourage them from toe-picking, a habit to which they are particularly prone, and which is at best disabling and at worst fatal. They require a large pen with plenty of room for exercise, and can be kept on the ground if the soil is dry and free-draining. Otherwise they can be kept on wire. They appreciate having branches for perching and a pan of sand for a dust bath. You should also provide a covered area where they can shelter from the weather, and branches of pine trees for the hens to nest under. However, they are not as nervous as some other species of quail, and have the most delightful, playful character once they become accustomed to their regular keeper and can be hand tamed, with patience. They enjoy a varied diet, readily accepting pellets, mixed seeds, live food such as meal worms, fresh greenstuff, etc. They need access to clean drinking water at all times, and this should be changed twice a day in warm weather. Like other birds of the same family, these quails are susceptible to disease. Great care must be taken over hygiene, and all feeders and drinkers cleaned scrupulously every two or three days, if not more often. This aspect of bird care cannot be stressed too much as birds easily pick up disease from droppings and decaying foodstuffs, and these can also be introduced by the bird keeper on their shoes or clothing.
 

Chukar Partridge

Chukar Partridge

Chukar Partridge are uniquely colored, attractive, little birds that are just the right size for an individual serving of succulent meat. At 16 weeks of age they will yield about 16 ounces of dressed product. They have bright orange beaks and their plumage is primarily gray and light brown with black and white barred feathers on their sides.
 

Ringneck Pheasant

Ringneck Pheasant

Ringneck Pheasants originated in China. They have beautiful, brightly colored plumage with long tails. Ringnecks mature at about 23 weeks of age and will yield two pounds or more of dressed product. They are a very popular game bird and many are purchased for release and future hunting.
 

Ornamental Pheasants

Ornamental Pheasants

We only sell the Ornamental Pheasant Adult Pairs and if we have extra hens we will sell trios, but prices are for pairs only unless you call us at 207-433-0115 to see if we have extra hens for the breed you are wanting. Thank you for your contiunued business!
 

Ornamental Swans

Ornamental Swans

Swans are perhaps the most graceful species of birds on the planet. We have juveniles and breeders, with most swans available year-round.
 

Surrogator Special

Surrogator Special

The Surrogator® is a self-contained field unit that will establish a huntable population of game birds on your property. This is NOT an adult bird release system! The Surrogator® functions as a “surrogate parent” by providing food, water, warmth and protection for the first 5 weeks of the bird’s life. By placing the Surrogator® in a location where you would like to establish a huntable population of pheasant or quail, chicks raised in the unit become imprinted to that location. The bird's natural homing instinct motivates them to live and reproduce where they were raised and released. The Surrogator® will hold 125 day-old quail chicks or 65 day-old pheasant chicks until they reach 5 weeks of age. The greatest mortality on the life of game birds happens in the nest and before three weeks of age. Chicks raised in the Surrogator® are protected from predators and the elements at a time when they are most vulnerable. Research proves that game birds develop their natural survival instincts around 5 weeks of age. Chicks raised in the Surrogator® have limited human contact, further protecting the natural survivability of the birds.
 

Poultry Bantams

Poultry Bantams

We here at CM Game Bird Farm Have a wide variety of Bantam chicks. You can buy them as an assortment or you can order them as a "Specific Breed" also. If you choose to order specific breeds you will need to call us at 207-433-0115 to place your order! Otherwise all assortments can be ordered from the website. Thanks to all of our customers who have patronized us over the last 10 years on the web. We strive to fullfill all of your orders in a timely manner. Please order your chicks early so we can schedule to be delivered on time to you. CM Game Bird Farm & Hatchery 207-433-0115
 

Poultry Standards

Poultry Standards

We here at CM Game Bird Farm Have a wide variety of Standard chicks. You can buy them as an assortment or you can order them as a "Specific Breed" also. If you choose to order specific breeds you will need to call us at 207-433-0115 to place your order! Otherwise all assortments can be ordered from the website. Thanks to all of our customers who have patronized us over the last 10 years on the web. We strive to fullfill all of your orders in a timely manner. Please order your chicks early so we can schedule to be delivered on time to you. CM Game Bird Farm & Hatchery 207-433-0115
 

Guinea Keets

Guinea Keets

We Only sell Straight Run guines and they are available from June - August, so get your orders in early so we can ship your chicks on time to you. Thank you for your business! CM Game Bird Farm
 

Turkeys

Turkeys

Beautiful to behold, these stately lords of the barnyard must be seen to be appreciated. The metallic sheen of the feathers changes from copper to bronze to burnished gold as the light moves across them. Four feet in length, six feet from wing tip to wing tip, a full grown tom will weigh in at about 38 pounds. Hens easily go 22 pounds. No wonder the Pilgrims gave thanks for the wild ancestors of these present-day beauties
 

Covey Base Camp Systems

Covey Base Camp Systems

The challenge when releasing quail is getting them to stick around. You don’t want them to disperse onto your neighbor’s property, and you don’t want them to fill the bellies of predators. The NEW Covey Base Camp™, through years of research, solves these problems to help quail anchor on your land and survive to become “wild” birds. The NEW Covey Base Camp™, designed by a wildlife biologist, helps you reestablish solid quail populations by providing birds with food, water and shelter. For the past decade we have provided the Covey Base Camp as an effective and efficient management tool for quail hunters and dog trainers. This year we are providing you with a New Design that delivers the Same Results. This Second Generation Base Camp has all the advantages of the original unit, plus many additional benefits. In fact, if you were a quail you would not notice much difference at all. The changes have been made " from the quail up".
 

Gourmet Quail

Gourmet Quail

When we first started selling to restaurants we were doing it directly through what we now call mail order. As demand, and supply grew we knew we could not continue to do it direct, so in the early 80’s we started selling through foodservice and retail distributors nation wide. We continue to ship truckloads of product from everywhere from Miami to Seattle, from Bangor, ME to San Diego on a weekly basis. Our oldest signature item is our European Style Semi Boneless Quail. We remove all bones except the drummette of the leg and the wing bones. This “sleeve boned” product comes with our stainless steel grill pin (to hold open the body cavity) and has been a traditional favorite of upscale chefs for stuffing and baking for over 3 decades. With the introduction of the marination it has also become a popular grill item. In the late 80’s we saw the need for a way to make our quail easier for the “culinary impaired” to cook. In 1991, we started tumble marinating our birds in our own light seasoning. The tumble action helps tenderize the meat and the vacuum helps lock the moisture in better than traditional injection (which a lot of poultry processors do). With this addition they can be cooked straight out of the package and taste delicious, but the seasoning is light enough that it doesn’t interfere with anybody’s signature recipes. Around the same time we took direction from one of our chain customers and started splitting our birds down the breast instead of the back. We thought this customer was out of their mind when they requested it, but after thinking about it we saw the reasoning. Traditionally people have cooked our bone in quail by battering and frying. This customer was grilling them and learned that the traditional butterfly (back) cut would over cook the legs by the time the breast was done. They found if you if you split them down the breast there was more surface area to cook the breast more evenly. This would allow the breast and the legs to get finished at the same time consequently getting off the grill 2-3 minutes faster. In the spring of 2006 we created Bacon Wrapped Quail Breast and Leg portions as well as redeveloping our entire appetizer items including boneless quail breasts and partially boned quail legs. We introduced these in IQF, bulk, Marinated, natural versions. These items are perfect for caterers and upscale menus looking for a new idea. During the holiday season of 2006 we were featured prominently on the shelves of a national club store with our Bacon Wrapped Quail Appetizers. During the spring of 2007 we have been busy designing new retail items and redesigning old ones to better serve our customers. Look for and/or start asking for our new Bacon Wrapped Quail and Semi Boneless on the shelves of your neighborhood grocery store. ENJOY!!!!!!!
 

Gourmet Pheasant

Gourmet Pheasant

We here at CM Game Bird Farm take pride in our products and NOW we have for you "Our Customer" the delicious Whole Pheasant or Whole Smoked Pheasant for you to enjoy! Please scroll down to order yours below. Thanks and we look forward to serving you with more products like this coming soon.
 

Shipping Supplies

Shipping Supplies

We carry shipping supplies for major hatcheries and individual breeders for day-old chicks, juvenile birds and fully grown adult birds. USPS has regulations to meet if you are going to ship legally through the mail. Please contact us with your concerns if you are planning on shipping through the United States Postal Service. We have ALL regulations and also have ccontacts to help you out.
 

Smokers

Smokers

The new 4-rack Digital Smoker includes all the features of the Original Smoker, along with the benefits of digital technology. Temperature, time, and smoke are now completely controllable so you can decide how much smoke you want, how long your food is going to be smoked for, and at what temperature. Perfect for entertaining, creating gourmet foods in your own home, or just enjoying the flavor that smoking brings, the new Digital Smokers offer an easier and better way to automatically roast, smoke and barbecue in the outdoors. The new 6-rack Digital Smoker includes all the features of the Original Smoker along with the benefits of digital technology. Temperature, time, and smoke are now completely controllable so you can decide how much smoke you want, how long your food is going to be smoked for, and at what temperature. Perfect for entertaining, creating gourmet foods in your own home, or just enjoying the flavor that smoking brings, the new Digital Smokers offer an easier and better way to automatically roast, smoke and barbecue in the outdoors.
 

Shipping
 

Hungarian Partridge

Hungarian Partridge
 

Pickled Quail Eggs

Pickled Quail Eggs

Cases have 12 jars per case.
 

Magic Biotics

Magic Biotics

This product we have been using for 3 years now and has amazingly helped with the many difficulties that arise from raising gamebirds. It has saved us thousands of birds that we would have lost by using other antib iotics that did not seem to work, at least not as fast as we hoped for. Now we have made this available to our customers ONLY. SHIPPING IS INCLUDED IN THE PRICE Dosage: Dissolve 1- 500mg tablet per gallon of water and give to your chicks the day of arrival. For adult birds dissolve 2- 500 mg tablets to a gallon of water and watch the MAGIC work. Directions: Only give to your chicks the first 3-5 days and for adults give until they get better. We have witnessed customers that had problems and experienced relief in hours. THIS STUFF IS AMAZING!!!
 

Mearns Quail

Mearns Quail

One of the most sought after quail in North America is the Mearns quail. It sometimes is confused with another popular quail also sometimes called the Harlequin. The African Harlequin is not the Mearns Harlequin. The African Harlequin comes from South Africa while the Mearns comes from the southern United States and Mexico. The confusing factor is that the Mearns has many names. It is called the Harlequin quail, Black quail, Cincoreal quail, Codorniz Encinara, Codorniz Pinta, crazy quail, Mearns quail, painted quail and many more. Mearns are the most unusual of the New World quail. They look like a committee put them together, as they are out of proportion when compared to any other quail. Their heads are extra large, and their eyes are big and compelling when they give you their famous 'melt your heart stare'. Raising chicks: Most people have too much humidity in their incubators when hatching Mearns quail. If your hydrometer wet bulb is around 82 degrees F. this will allow the chicks to remain smaller and seem to be stronger when they hatch. Mearns chicks do not know to eat by instinct. They must be taught. In the wild, the parents catch and feed insects to the chicks from their beaks. Several methods have been used successfully to get the chicks to eat under captive conditions. The most popular is to fed small mealworms from tweezers to the chicks. (Never just throw mealworms into the pen for the chicks to pick up as the will begin to pick toes.) They soon learn that the mealworms tastes pretty good and will get on your hand for their food. Try anything that you can think of to convince them to eat or else they will die.
 

Blue Scale Quail

Blue Scale Quail

The Blue Scale is about 10 1/2 inches long at maturity. The sexes are almost identical in plumage color. Their name come from the delicate scale markings in their plumage which varies from slate blue to grayish in color. Both sexes have the cotton topped crest. Males can be detected from females by the plain brownish chin coloration. The females will have light pin stripes in the chin area. (Johnsgard, 1973). Raising Blue Scale Quail: Some people dislike this quail because of their nervous disposition. They are like the Gambel and the California Valley quail because they are an active, nervous, and somewhat timid bird. Although they are suspicious, people have found they can be tamed down and will come over to the fence for a treat of mixed grain. Generally, Blue Scale quail are very good layers. The eggs are larger than Bobwhite and are not so pointed on the little end. The eggs hatch best in a dry incubator. The key to raising Blues is a large pen if you can put them on the ground. Blues can be raised on wire, but if you climate is dry and your soil is light, I would recommend they be put on the ground at least during the breeding season. A good size pen would be 20 feet long by 8 feet long.
 

Incubation & Brooder Care

Instructions on Incubation of gamebirds and how to brood them after they hatch.
 

Carribean Flamingos
 

Johnny House (Click Here)

Johnny House (Click Here)

Our Johnny Houses are an invaluable tool for gun dog handlers and Quail Plantation owners alike. Whether you just don’t have a good supply of birds near your location or simply need to keep a good number of birds on hand any time of year….a Quail Johnny House is your answer. Here we know the value of producing a low maintenance bulletproof product for our customers. We know that during the limited shooting season hunters and plantation owners do not want to be concerned with emergency bird orders or having to throw together a secure place to keep them….and that Gun Dog Breeders and Gun Dog Trainers need to keep birds on hand all year round….This house is built specifically for you! We field three different models of Johnny houses. Shown here our most popular model is the mid-sized model simply called “The Johnny House”.
 

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